Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Tim Price Bloggin' For D'Addario Woodwinds- Every day is Thanksgiving !






My friends there is a very thin line, sometimes with a pale shadow attached, between what happens on the bandstand,in the shed,writing your thoughts in your blogs, and in the classroom. All involve the now, listening being in the moment.

Instruments, reeds,paper,laptop, pencil, the mind as messenger for the mind and heart are our tools for being in this life.

Whether it's playing with a cool band,or some friends playing Monk tunes, writing a really good line of poetics,learning some new ideas or tunes, or connecting with and enjoying your students.All are gifts that I continue to be thankful for, and always will be.We now have to believe in our true selves and realize that what we do is a gift!

Every day is Thanksgiving !

Let me also add, to me , communication is most important . So, it there is no direct communication with the audience for which you are playing, there goes your job. Play music for people- and watch the result! John Coltrane used to talk about imagining his music reaching out and embracing his audiences.Remember before Trane was Trane he was a player who could rock the house on the blues, and play any standard song.
When you speak of touching someone and reaching out- There's Charles Lloyd. His contribution since he hit the scene is a music of huge evocativeness, brilliantly conceived and played. Charles always is always coming up with music of immense power and authority. As great as any jazz master as well- and someone who has the wisdom to move forward as himself.His message is a supreme joy-and just watch the audience react as he plays. Communication!

We are thrust into life having to make decisions of all sorts. Most likely the one who doesn’t have a good understanding of certain things in a particular area will not make the best decisions there. When it comes to making progress in your life, you have to know what you actually want and don’t want. Of course there’s going to be times when you sometimes don’t know what you want, at that time you need to research and/or explore some things to find out what it is that you actually are looking for. But even before you start the process; it would be very beneficial to you if you have your goals in mind clearly noted before you go forward. A lot of times what happens is, we get lost in the middle of exploring and researching and forget why we started the pursuits in the first place. Of course we are going to get new ideas, get inspired, and increase our understanding as we go, but we just have to make sure we organize our thoughts so we’ll be able to make the next logical step to stay on course. New options will even come about as we go but we have to make sure we don’t get lost in the shuffle and get deterred in other directions that are not consistent with our original goals. Maybe our original goals do need to change a little bit, and that’s cool too. We all project things based on our knowledge and understanding at the time anyway but we can see the heart of what we were doing if we clearly documented what our goals were at the time they came to us. Action Steps 1. Think of one goal you want to accomplish in a particular category in your life, your career, family. 2. Think about what it will take to reach that goal. 3. Spell out the steps it will take to get there 4. Underneath each step put what type of questions that need to be asked in order to make that step happen. 5. As you get your questions together, make sure you research and ask others who are experts in the particular area so you’ll even know what questions to ask to get answers you really need. 6. Converse with people about your goals and your steps towards those goals. People always have resources that you’d never discover unless you talk to them. 7. As you get your questions and answers, start implementing what you receive and move accordingly to walk out every step towards your goals. You can follow these 7 steps and apply it to anything you want to accomplish no matter what category.

I hope these words help motivate you to explore your music even more.


Keep the channel open. Everyday...is Thanksgiving. Enjoy the holiday and the moment.




Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Tim Price Bloggin' For D'Addario Woodwinds- Wild Bill Moore. . real deal legend.



Tim Price Bloggin' For D'Addario Woodwinds- Wild Bill Moore. . real deal legend.






 Ah, mercy, mercy me,
Ah, things ain't what they used to be, no, no.
Where did all the blue skies go?


.....Many times you have heard this and had no idea the sax solo was Wild Bill Moore. His rock n' roll hit called- 
  "We're Gonna Rock, We're Gonna Roll" for the Savoy label which was a modest hit and is remembered today as one of many candidates for the first rock and roll record. It was one of the first records played by Alan Freed on his "Moondog" radio shows in 1951. However, by the standards of its time it was quite a primitive recording, notable mainly for the juxtaposition of the words “rock” and “roll”, and the battling saxophones of Moore and Williams. In 1949, he cut "Rock And Roll", reportedly featuring Scatman Crothers on vocals.


 

Wild Bill Moore (born William M. Moore, June 13, 1918 - August 1, 1983) was an American R&B and jazz tenor saxophone player. Moore earned a modest hit on the Hot R&B charts with "We're Gonna Rock, We're Gonna Roll", which also was one of the earliest rock and roll records.
Moore was born in Detroit Michigan and began playing the alto saxophone at an early age. However, prior to his musical career, he was an amateur boxer, winning Michigan's Golden Gloves light heavyweight championship in 1937, before briefly turning professional. By the early 1940s, Moore abandoned his boxing career in favor of music, and was inspired by musicians Chu Berry and Illinois Jacquet to switch to tenor saxophone. In 1944, he made his recording debut, accompanying Christine Chatman, the wife of Memphis Slim, for Decca Records. Between 1945 and 1947, Moore was performing and recording in Los Angeles with Slim Gaillard, Jack McVea, Big Joe Turner, Dexter Gordon, and played on Helen Humes’ hit recording, "Be-Baba-Leba".[1][2]
In 1947 he moved back to Detroit and began recording with his own band, which included baritone player Paul Williams, later famous for "The Hucklebuck".
Moore continued recording and playing in clubs in and around Detroit. In this period he also recorded several jazz albums for the Jazzland label. In 1971, he was sought out by Marvin Gaye to play saxophone on the album What's Going On, notably the track "Mercy Mercy Me".
Eventually he returned to Los Angeles, California and lived there until his death, aged 65.
Legend yes...someone who deserves more credit? Hell yes! Check out his recordings and search Ebay for him- his message is a lesson and still a fresh sound that is not only original but real.

~ Till next week....keep it real- - Tim Price

















 


Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Tim Price Bloggin' For D'Addario- Support Your School's Music Programs!







Music is a gift that is life long. Plato once said that music “is a more potent instrument than any other for education”. You will find many teachers of young children who would agree with him. Recent research has found that music uses both sides of the brain, a fact that makes it valuable in all areas of development. Music affects the growth of a child’s brain academically, emotionally, physically and spiritually.





Music is academic. For some people, this is the primary reason for providing music lessons to their children. A recent study from the University of California found that music trains the brain for higher forms of thinking. Second graders who were given music lessons scored 27% higher on proportional math and fractions tests than children who received no special instruction. Research indicates that musical training permanently wires a young mind for enhanced performance. Music is physical. Music can be described as a sport. Learning to sing and keep rhythm develops coordination. The air and wind power necessary to blow a flute, trumpet or saxophone promotes a healthy body. Music is emotional. Music is an art form. We are emotional beings and every child requires an artistic outlet. Music may be your child’s vehicle of expression. Music is for life. Most people can’t play soccer, or football at 70 or 80 years of age but they can PLAY the clarinet, saxophone, bassoon and piano and sing. Music is a gift you can give your child that will last their entire lives. TRY THESE ASPECTS- TO ASSIST AND ENRICH. __ Help kids go to a local concert - let them hear live music as a special thing. __ Donate a private lesson to some in need young learners. __ Contribute to 10+ months of instrument rentals - or donate some used instruments you buy at yard sales. __ Provide students with private lessons -by letting them mow your lawn etc- in exchange for tuition you assist with. __ Celebrate music yourself by sponsoring a concert. __ Donate a record collection, music books and CD's. OK... there are more of course but try these and make a difference.










- Keeping The Channel Open

Daily practice also allows me to imprint the material in my mind until it becomes instinct. One long practice session will not do this. For most players, useful techniques can only be acquired through repetition. I always try to work new materials into songs, lines and grooves that I like. For me it's sort of like upgrading my musical mind so that my playing becomes reoriented in the directions I choose. Increasing familiarity with they materials is a good thing. It's like learning a language--music is a language. Through diligent , consistent daily work, a tangible musical substance is incrementally developed. First of all, you develop physical stamina through the repeated effort. Also , from day to day, you accumulate ideas and expand on the themes of your practice. If you are working Major chords; the first day you might just work on arpeggios, the next day you might see some connection with other musical sources, such as songs, or through or whatever is interesting to you. By continuing to work with focus on the same things from day to day, you will find that your level of proficiency has risen and expanded to include all these other sources. Your practicing every day results in the acquisition of technique, musical intelligence, improved tone, and stamina. Just the quest to continuously find something to practice will increase your creativity.
My contribution is to spread love and inspiration through music. In some small way I would like to think that this could make a difference. In the process I hope to inspire people to seek the truth in themselves and music, and get deep inside of the art form we love. 

It's all about that. As Lester Bowie said- " It all depends on what ya know". ~TILL NEXT WEEK....Keep on. Tim Price







ALSO- PLEASE REMEMBER ; Tim Price is available for a wide variety of tours, festivals, guest appearances and workshops. Tim Price is also available as a guest soloist with a small group or big band, and as a jazz clinician or guest lector. Tim is a Rico Reeds and Selmer saxophone artist. His books are published through Hal Leonard. Please contact Tim at: TimPriceJazz@aol.com Phone ; 610-370-1544 I TEACH IN NYC- READING, PA AND ON SKYPE. SKYPE MUSIC STUDY WITH TIM PRICE These SKYPE sessions with Tim Price are informal and relaxed, yet highly structured. If you are a novice improvisor or even a pro who has always felt there was more to learn, you'll truly enjoy these lessons. Hands-on "Real World" Learning , you'll more than simply learn-you'll do. By gaining new knowledge you'll create momentum that can transform your musical future. You'll sustain results. You'll discover multiple ways to produce real, sustainable results. Take advantage of Tim Price's 35 plus years of teaching, performing, recording & writing experience. Step by step online videos to help you improve your playing at a logical pace. On screen spoken help explaining how to reach your next level. Timpricejazz@aol.com for most current fee info.

























Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Tim Price Bloggin' For D'Addario Woodwinds- Style, personal vision & personal agenda.





~Improvising means creating music that is spontaneous, of the moment, and uniquely your own. So think of it as the instrument becomes a process of self-discovery, finding out what your music really sounds like. You develop a period of looking within, stripping away the excess and listening for the simple voice that really is our own. It’s there, listen for it. Being able to improvise on I GOT RHYTHM changes appears much more as a puzzle or study that must be negotiated than as an opportunity look within and reach for new sounds you hear. Improvising means creating music that is spontaneous, of the now, and your own. It will not get played if you yourself don’t play it, and try. You have to focus your practicing for maximum progress towards creating a powerful forward motion as a player. Add personal guidance of a master teacher and artist, and you’re poised to grow as a musician and as a performer. Todays student needs substance ! Plus how to focus practicing of improvising on the essential elements,the actual substance of what to play and how to develop it in your personal style, and dealing with practicing of specific vocabulary. It's what I call, what to shed! Then you got to understand jazz is part of culture. Bird, Prez,Basie,Pee Wee Russell, Roland Kirk, Duke, Hawk and all those giants who gave something to culture. What did they have? They had the the building blocks of jazz improvisation. MELODY ! Then guide-tone lines, and melodic Rhythm. Real world building blocks of jazz improvisation. In a word- BASICS that last for your career. Just some thinking on subjects we all love and are close to our agenda.
..Living a life of purpose reflects who you are deep inside, your beliefs, values and passion for living. It is about following your heart and doing what you love to do with passion and purpose. This may initially feel overwhelming and go too "deep" but that's exactly where you need to go - deep into your heart, beyond the busy, superficial day-to-day chores and demands of life. Beyond the fast paced day of the modern mom who typically deals with her career, various children's activities, computer viruses, proverbial household cleaning, - overall role of superwoman who never had or has had a chance to do some real soul searching for real meaning in her life. Do you feel like you're spinning of the hamster wheel and getting nowhere? Just talking...and talking.Do you wonder if your life counts for anything? Despite the many resources of self-help tools available today via magazines, books, tapes, videos, and seminars, many still feel unfulfilled and lacking purpose in themselves, family and career. What ever happened to just getting together- making some coffee and playing some standards ad blues.Life is about choices - good, bad, happy, unhappy, purpose filled or void. It is important to intentionally and passionately seek to pursue joy, fulfillment and purpose despite the situations or people who may seem to be trying to take it away from you. Your choices should be reflective of who you are and what you believe in vs. the standards and beliefs of someone else.Are you really hearing the music- or going for just who's popular? The following are wide sweeping key components that require considerable processing in their own right in order to most fully develop your own true purpose and are full length topic discussions within themselves - please be sure to process them in your own time and according to your specific needs.Each person holds unique and very individualized gifts. Allow yourself to really explore your current and past skills - even some you may not even be aware of yet. But also....Recognize them, write them down and then think of how you could integrate your most compelling skills into an area of your life now....Strive for tone & see you next week- Tim Price for D'Addario Woodwinds.
















Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Tim Price Bloggin' For D'Addario Woodwinds- The sound is you. Sound and you!




SOUND AND BUILDING A BETTER SOUND.... Long tones should be the most important part of your practice routine. This fact is surprising to many beginner or intermediate saxophonists. Why Go Long? Long tones help you develop muscles and skills that are extremely important in most playing situations: • Embouchure. If the embouchure is correct throughout all of the long tones, then you will feel the burn as you reach the high notes. Make sure to really squeeze the corners in the high notes, and do not bite. If you feel the biting, stop, rest for a little while, and then continue when you feel ready. • Tonal quality. By playing long tones, you become subconsciously aware of the overtones and can develop a finer tone quality. How to Practice Long tones should be practiced the following way: 1. Begin with low Bb and play this note at a piano volume the best you can for 10 seconds. 2. If you need to, use a metronome and set it to 60 beats per minute. 3. Go up chromatically and play each note in the range of the instrument. With correct lower lip and breath support as well as well-developed control of the muscles involved, you should be able to keep the intonation even. 4. Be conscious of tone quality, intonation, breath support and embouchure. 5. Use a mirror to see your embouchure. Long tones must be practiced for about 15 minutes at a time. In the first session, start at low Bb and ascend to the highest note you can play correctly. In the second session, start at the highest note you can play correctly, and descend to low Bb. Try your best to practice long tones as much as you can.




The experience of creating space – within your body, your life, and with others – is incredibly liberating. I know that the more space I give myself, the more grounded I feel within who I am. And the more space I create the deeper connection I experience in my music and life. This isn’t really about physical ‘space’, but about creating space in the way you communicate and interact with others. This means not letting thoughts interrupt the connection that’s being created between you and the other person. It’s a feeling of spaciousness that exists within your body and inner self. It’s an experience of being clear, present and grounded in who you truly are – and using that connection as the foundation for relating to others from a more authentic and meaningful place. Connecting with others authentically takes a conscious commitment in the moment. In my own experience, when I make that commitment, I find I’m rewarded many times over. Rewarded – not because I’ve been able to ‘contribute’ through my words – but because the experience of being truly present provides a much deeper, fulfilling sense of connection between everything. Beyond music, life and anything. Internal joy.



The ability to create space with others in this way has deepened and aware within my own self , I’m naturally able to be more present with others without loosing that inner connection to myself. Being present to someone in this way may not always seem ‘easy’. If you let yourself, you can easily become distracted by your thinking: including devising what you’ll say next; mulling over your judgements about the other person (or worrying about what they think of you); feeling a need to interrupt their speaking with your own opinion; or thinking about something else entirely.  It's something to think about as a performer and artist as well as a student.


Be positive. Always believe that you will achieve your goal. As soon as you stop believing, you have already failed.BUT- Keep trying. as Phil Woods once told me - " If you don't try you die." Don't forget the words of Lao-Tze: "A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step." Put Lao and Phil's words together in your mind...you can't loose! Till next week.. keep on the path- Tim



























Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Tim Price Bloggin' For D'Addario Woodwinds- Wilbur Sweatman- That's Got 'Em!






Wilbur C. Sweatman (1882-1961) is one of the most important, yet unheralded musicians involved in the transition of ragtime into jazz in the early twentieth century. In That's Got 'Em!, Mark Berresford tracks this energetic pioneer over a seven-decade career. His talent transformed every genre of   advent of rock and roll- circus sideshows, vaudeville  night clubs, and cabarets. Sweatman was the first musician to be offered a long-term recording contract, and he dazzled listeners with jazz clarinet solos before the Original Dixieland Jazz Band's so-called "first jazz records." Sweatman toured the vaudeville circuit for over twenty years and presented. His bands were a fertile breeding ground of young jazz talent, featuring such future stars as Duke Ellington, Coleman Hawkins, and Jimmie Lunceford. Sweatman subsequently played pioneering roles in radio and recording production. His high profile and sterling reputation in both the black and white entertainment communities made him a natural choice for administering the estate of Scott Joplin and other notable   performers and composers. That's Got 'Em! is the first full-length biography of this pivotal figure , providing a compelling account of his life and times. hIs playing was one of a kind world class, and still to this day fresh.




YOU NEED THIS BOOK!
 More important than anything, this is the place where the rubber hit the road.


That's Got 'Em!: The Life and Music of Wilbur C. Sweatman....t