Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Tim Price Bloggin' For D'Addario Woodwinds- a organized way to approach transcribing.




Following is a step by step, organized way to approach transcribing.
TRANSCRIBING

1. Begin with short forms, simple solos. Prez < Lester Young > is a perfect starting player to study.
2. Look for a tune for which you know the progression when possible, or try to find the progression in good legal fake book.
3. Check your turntable/cassette deck with a piano or tuner to assure proper pitch and key.
4. Tape your selection in order to make re-listen- ing to a particular phrase easier to do.
5. Re-play problem (or fast) passages at 1/2 speed (7 1/2 to 3 3/4 IPS on tape or 33 to 16 1/2 on a turntable). This lowers the pitch one octave and reduces the tempo.
6. It is best to use your own instrument to transcribe with, rather than a piano (unless you are a pianist). It is sometimes helpful to use a piano to solve questions about the harmony.
7. On a sheet of manuscript paper, mark off the number of measures (using double bars to delineate sections if you desire) and write the chord changes above the measures. Use slash marks to indicate where chords fall in measures where there are two or more chords. During this process you should be listening to become aware of the form of the tune, identifying "guideposts" (number of bars in each section, recurring rhythmic figures, recurring phrase patterns, etc.) which might help you as you progress to the "note by note" process of the transcription.

8. On a separate sheet of paper begin your transcription of the solo line. Begin by putting the pitches in each measure or phrase using only note heads; fill in the beams and stems (rhythms) after completion of each few bars.

Be sure to refer back to your chord/form sheet ,knowledge of the harmony might be helpful in identifying " not heard pitches" in the solo line.
9. If you encounter problems in identifying the pitches in order.Many times, identifying the more easily heard pitches in a measure or phrase will make the mystery notes easier to find.
10. Play back phrases or sections at regular speed to check for accuracy; play along with the recording.
11. Play along with the whole solo as much as you can, without the music. If you have used your own instrument to transcribe the solo you will be surprised at how easy it is to play the solo from memory.


Check it out and enjoy.... also- for some more ideas....check through these ; IF...you want some ideas on ii-v's...look here; http://www.timpricejazz.com/lessons/iiV.pdf '

If your looking for a nice warm up / sax sound study-look here; http://www.timpricejazz.com/lessons/sax_warmup.pdf

for info on tune study; look here; http://www.timpricejazz.com/lessons/learningatune.html

reed info, look here; http://www.timpricejazz.com/lessons/dealingwreeds.html sax players food

for thought:look here; http://www.timpricejazz.com/lessons/creativepurity.html

A nice jazz line using II-V. http://www.saxontheweb.net/Price/Dec00.html And a I-VI-II-V...of course http://www.saxontheweb.net/Price/Jul01.html

If you check my web page- you'll find some intervallic studys on II- V. http://www.timpricejazz.com/lessons/intervalic1.jpg

For those interested in some Bird & bop to shed...check out; http://www.saxontheweb.net/Price/Bird-ologyStudy.html http://www.saxontheweb.net/Price/Bird-ologyStudy.html

Enjoy~ TIM PRICE 


 








 

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Tim Price Bloggin' For D'Addario Woodwinds- BE THANKFUL - Thanksgiving blog with a soup recipe and a bonus drink recipe and blog talk..

 
 


All human beings are linked together through the timeless, universal chain of history and events. Learning to be thankful is an essential part of being happy. It helps us appreciate the things that we have right now. You might feel that don’t have a lot to be thankful for. However, you should realize that there are people out there who would want to trade places with you.

These Thank you so much, images is one way of reminding yourself that you have so much to be thankful and grateful for.  Be thankful that you are still breathing, that you have friends and family around you. Be grateful for the beautiful world around you. Smile to a random person at least once a day! It will make you both feel better. AND- BE THANKFUL YOU CAN PLAY MUSIC...for those dear readers who read this blog who are musicians. It's another kind of gift.



 
Whether it's playing with a cool band,or some friends playing Monk tunes, writing a really good line of poetics,learning some new ideas or tunes, or connecting with and enjoying your students.All are gifts that I continue to be thankful for, and always will be.We now have to believe in our true selves and realize that what we do is a gift! Every day is Thanksgiving !  

BELOW. . . Is a recipe for soup & a drink recipe...your going to have some fun!!!


Ingredients

  • 46 oz. vegetable juice
  • 1 c. vodka
  • 2 tbsp. lemon juice
  • 2 tbsp. chopped dill
  • 1 tbsp. prepared horseradish
  • 1 tbsp. Worcestershire
  • 1 tbsp. Hot sauce
  • 3/4 tsp. black pepper
  • 3/4 tsp. celery seed
  • Jalapeno peppers or dilly beans- your choice, for serving
  • Lemon wedges, for serving
  • Celery, for serving

    Combine vegetable juice, vodka, lemon juice, dill, prepared horseradish, Worcestershire, hot sauce, black pepper and celery seed. Serve over ice with jalapeno peppers or dilly beans- your choice, lemon wedges, and celery. cheers!

    Roasted Pumpkin Soup With Brown Butter and Thyme Recipe

    • 1medium sugar pumpkins or kabocha squash, about 4 1/2 pounds total
    • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
    • 8 whole stems thyme, plus 1 tablespoon picked thyme leaves
    • 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) unsalted butter
    • 2 large leeks, white and pale green parts only, quartered lengthwise, and finely chopped (about 1 1/2 cups)
    • 1 small yellow onion, finely sliced (about 3/4 cup)
    • 1 quart homemade or store-bought low-sodium vegetable or chicken stock
    • 2 bay leaves
    • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
    • 1 tablespoon juice from 1 lemon

    Directions

  • 1.
    Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and preheat oven to 375°F. Split pumpkins in half with a heavy chef's knife or cleaver. Scoop out the seeds and discard or save for another use. Rub pumpkins on all surfaces with oil and season with salt and pepper. Place cut-side-down on a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet and place in oven. Scatter whole thyme stems on top. Roast until completely tender, flipping halfway through cooking, 1 to 1 1/2 hours total. Remove from oven and let rest until cool enough to handle.
  • 2.
    Meanwhile, melt 2 tablespoons butter in a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add leeks and onion and cook, stirring frequently, until softened but not browned, about 4 minutes. Add stock and maple syrup and bring to a simmer.
  • 3.
    Using a large spoon, scoop flesh out of pumpkin and add it to the pot. Discard stem and skins. Let simmer for 15 minutes longer, then remove bay leaves and discard.
  • 4.
    Puree soup in a blender in batches until completely smooth, straining through a fine mesh strainer to catch any particles or fibers. Season soup to taste with salt and pepper.
  • 5.
    To serve, heat remaining four tablespoons butter in a small skillet over medium heat, swirling constantly, until foam subsides and butter takes on a deep brown color with a nutty aroma, about 1 minute. Remove from heat and add remaining tablespoon thyme leaves (they'll crackle as they hit the hot butter). Add lemon juice and season brown butter to taste with salt.
  • 6.
    Ladle soup into serving bowls and drizzle with thyme brown butter. Serve immediately
  • ENJOY......
So- till next week - practice hard and eat more vegetables and fruit. Don't forget to do something nice for somebody too, remember compassion is essential with each other. I hope these words help motivate you to explore your music even more. Keep the channel open. Everyday...is Thanksgiving.
 

Enjoy the holiday and the moment. Thank you-Tim ......









Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Tim Price Bloggin' For D'Addario Woodwinds- Rickie Trujillo- a must read ; book review.


Compulsive reading! 
The book is a page turner till the very end.
Plenty of twists and turns. Makes for a great read that is hard to put down. Looking for a book that not only is fresh and well written but also so real that you start to assume that a movie will be bound to follow.


Nicholas Bradley is a skilled writer and he takes you on a fast paced and wild ride. 

Nicholas characters are always interesting, yet all still believable.Highly recommended and I sure hope there are more to follow for this one of a kind gifted writer with a true sense of realism, conflicts, successes and mystery that develops like a well paced jazz solo.

Rickie Trujillo- a must read and get yourself to amazon.com ASAP.

https://www.amazon.com/Rickie-Trujillo-Nicholas-Bradley/dp/0998490628/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1510799953&sr=1-1&keywords=Rickie+Trujillo


Even though Rickie Trujillo is a novel, it is very reminiscent of my childhood experiences, with baseball being the only thing that kept me out of trouble.
--Danny Arambulo, Sergeant, Los Angeles Police Department 


About the Author

Nicholas Bradley worked as an English and ESL teacher in junior high, middle, and high school in Los Angeles throughout his thirty year career. The schools where he taught were in the center of neighborhoods of poverty and crime, gangs, drugs and graffiti, the setting of his novel, Rickie Trujillo. Many of the students he taught and tutored during his career were, like Rickie, active gang members and/or taggers.
During the ten years in Los Angeles preceding his teaching career, Bradley worked as a road musician, truck driver, messenger, and pianist. 



  • Paperback: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Upper Hand Press LLC; 1 edition (September 11, 2017)





 



 

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Tim Price Bloggin' For D'Addario Woodwinds- Keep an open mind- be vigilant.




My philosophy about personal musical growth is that musicians should learn how to think, listen and talk about music. Likewise, I pass this on to my students of all ages. IT'S WORKING! If your in 5th grade or a Doctor studying jazz clarinet with me for fun. There's something we all have. It's this criteria: brain, ears, and voice. Naturally, these three are interrelated. If you think about music, then it follows that you can easily talk about it. Listening is the most important part. Without ears, music would not exist. If I had to pick the most valuable musical tool for shaping musical growth, it would be personal taste. Always visualize only favorable and beneficial situations.Music helps with this.Try to use positive words in your inner dialogues or when talking with others. Once a negative thought enters your mind, you have to be aware of it and endeavor to replace it with a constructive one.Persistence will eventually teach your mind to think positively and ignore negative thoughts.It does not matter what your circumstances are at the present moment. Think positively, expect only favorable results and situations, and circumstances will change accordingly. It may take some time for the changes to take place, but eventually they do. A student once asked me if a particular note "worked" in a particular setting; my response was, "only if you like it". Take it a step further Bob Dylan plays the same C7 chord that Pat Martino does. Same 4 notes, likewise when Sonny Rollins hits a D minor 7th, it's the same chord that Jeff Beck might play or Keith Jarrett. It's how YOU deliver it. Lots of cooks use tomatoes and basil you dig? Same deal.Keeping a open mind can create a path for a student. There's a big difference between Bud Powell and Duke Ellington. But they both have a message. Think about it.Personal musical taste expands infinitely. This allows for musical evolution. Just live it. Go for it. Play it. Write it. Above all, use your own personal, ever growing, musical taste. Hence, music is the real teacher. Share the music and propagate it as much as you can. As always,strive for tone and help your school music programs, in every way you can.


For the shed; I have some very interesting concepts here, and things that are fun and provoke some fresh ideas on II-V. II-V-I Patterns: Starting on the Tonic of the II Minor 7 Chord.
This lesson in seven parts: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 , August 2002 This is a very clear and useful lesson using II-V. Lots to play/study. http://www.saxontheweb.net/Price/II-V-I-Patterns1.html I've taken a basic study and then moved it through six steps. Then I included one of my own based on a variation of some of the first six. I think it's always good for all of us to go back to a basic pattern study to clear our ears and refresh our chops. Look at all six shapes. As you start to hear the line, go back and write something of your own based on mine. Minor 7b5 to Dominant 7b9 August 2001 http://www.saxontheweb.net/Price/Aug01.html 2 Bar II-V Phrases - via Entire Range of the Sax.http://www.saxontheweb.net/Price/Sept01.html This is designed to assist you in using your saxophone fully! Full range! HAVE FUN.
This might help add some new ideas to your playing and keep your shed time fun. Enjoy~

On You Tube- There is so much great music out there. I recently heard Henry Grimes, Andrew Cyrille and Paul Dunmall taking it all the way out. Saxophonists NEED to listen to Paul Dunmall- he is fantastic and just a joy to hear.Wonderful!

Till next week, Keep an open mind.

BE VIGILANT! Think about others more than yourself!

Enjoy- Tim Price






Thursday, November 2, 2017

Tim Price Bloggin' For D'Addario Woodwinds- 66 Years in the Scorpio Lane;Making a living with a horn in my hand!






66.years in the Scorpio lane.
Making a living with a horn in my hand!




Today I turn 66, and you know what? I'm glad I'm the era, and foundation as a person that comes from the dues that comes with that age.
As a young man I was taught to respect experience, listen and learn. God knows I did! Otherwise I would not be here writing these blogs !
I came up in the time period when I'd go to hear Count Basie and couldn't wait to hear Marshall Royal and Lockjaw Davis. Sure they were older men, but that was where the music was. The real essence of time spent at a craft, and hard work. You listened and you learned. The results were there but you had to take the time to find, listen and apply. Same as with my Berklee education, I was with the masters. Guys who were in the field, and earned stripes. I carried that vibe all through my life and guess what? IT WORKED.


So many times, and I note with extreme interest that people feel the need to juggle the numbers in their age. Why? Let your experience and dues paid
lead the way.The years post-Berklee as I say many times here, riding through the South in Motown band buses with acts like Billy Paul, Lloyd Price, Chuck Berry on
through major road big bands, where you were living on the bus for months and months traveling,and major rock bands.Gigs in Boston as a student,when you were EXPECTED to be inside the gig,playing with musicians two times your age,dealing and learning. Experience that could never be bought, on AND OFF the bandstand.Think about it.

As a teen- my years were way different. I was playing high school dances, and later bars by the time I was 16, the thrill and the chase of getting into bars like my friends was kind of old hat after a few dozen working gigs. Going drinking was something different, and meeting women was immediate.You learned fast on both counts- or the dues would haunt you big time.I came to play,to learn and as I found out years later survive.


Rehearsing big bands in local bars where stale beer and tobacco smell was the call of the day. I also did some theater things, but I was working three nights a week and playing shore points in Jersey in the summer or Philly suburbs. The bands paid higher and I needed back up cash for Berklee- as I was dead set on going there. The summer gigs were a ball, most times from 8 to 2. There was more after hours places, that ran from 11 at night to 6 in the morning.You held your schedule, and stayed on track. The bands always car pooled, or in the summers had comp rooms at shore points. The money was excellent! It sure beat the alternative, I was working with older players, in places where I had to conduct myself, and be responsible to be on the sets on time.
Plus- knowing all the music without a Ipad in front of you, or a real book touch screen for a tune you should of known before you took any gig.It still baffles me how a University level tenor saxophonist can not know the bridge melody to " Body & Soul"! Those kind of things when I was 18 you had to know, There was no excuse. There was NO coddling, I just could see John LaPorta's face with some things these days.But as I grew ,through my saxophone, I could gain entrance into another world that most never dreamed of. ~ AKA-Making a living with a horn in my hand!

I embrace getting older.I walk proud. I'm getting stronger, more experienced, learning to live our life to the fullest, it's actually a process of continual mental development. Each day is better.

I will always have the sense of freedom I had in my 20's. The older I get, the less I care about what others think of me. Therefore, the older I get, the more I enjoy life.It works that way with the music also.Teaching as well.

I'll leave you with a quote that sums up what I 'm after ;

Anyone who stops learning is old, whether at twenty or eighty. Anyone who keeps learning stays young.
The greatest thing in life is to keep your mind young.
Henry Ford

Learning to live stress free and without negative thoughts, is the key to staying positive.The key to staying positive, is living through a lifetime of stressful and negative situations with a positive outlook.
I choose early on to be positive, it works.

BY THE WAY- The picture at the top of the Blog is me when I was 19 at Berklee
At that time, we'd session every Tuesday-Thursday on the 2ed floor. In this great room that Hal Grossman ( Saxophonist Steve's brother )who was Berklee faculty and a great friend made sure I had access to. In other words a key for myself! That room was the best, great piano, sound etc. Many times other Berklee faculty would come by and join us. Many times Steve Grossman and Junior Cook would come by when in town and we'd know we had much more work to do! LOL. Understanding that in my late teens was an asset for realizing the sun didn't rise and set when I wanted. I had to work for it- I was never feeling entitled. The music is bigger than all of us anyhow!

ALSO- I WAS PLAYING RICO BROWN BOX #5 REEDS. Great times- great reeds and this was about 1970. I used 5's on Bari too! LaVoz medium hard on alto. Those LaVoz boxes from that era-the black and green box. THE HOLY GRAIL OF ALTO REEDS!



I never had to work a day in my life,because I love what I do! And I say that all the
time- good times or bad.

Till next week- Tim Price


Monday, October 9, 2017

Tim Price Bloggin' For D'Addario Woodwinds- Jazz is a personal experience.








THINK ABOUT...YOUR SOLO.

Opening your thoughts to the unknown realms of your own imagination. At this point in time in jazz, everything seems to be published and everything seems to almost be written down. We are in a great educational state. But where are the people who are really reaching within and trusting themselves to their own creative muse? This is the element that I am addressing here.
 

A cohesive solo flows together and has a sense of logic to it. Each part builds upon the last, whether rhythmically or melodically, as it guides you to the end of the solo. The sense of cohesion makes you feel like the solo is a deliberate and well-constructed piece of music.The opposite of a cohesive solo is one that meanders without any sense of direction or purpose. When listening to such a solo you'll probably wonder if the player is lost (i.e. doesn't know where they are in the song form), or maybe you'll keep wondering when they're going to stop playing. By the way, there is a syndrome amongst beginners that typically occurs when playing a meandering solo. You're unhappy with your ideas, but you keep playing chorus after chorus with the thought that maybe the next chorus will be "the one". If you've ever done this, or if you've listened to others doing it, you know how things typically turn out... MOTIF DEVELOPMENT!! TRY IT YOU'LL LIKE IT.There are several ways to build a cohesive solo, but I think the easiest method is through the use of motif development. A motif is a musical phrase that is repeated through the course of a solo. To avoid sounding like we're just playing the same phrase over and over again, we gradually alter that phrase rhythmically and/or melodically. This gradual development creates a cohesive solo because each phrase logically moves to the next; creating a sense that everything is connected.You can use motif development in a variety of ways when creating a solo. For instance, you could use one motif that you develop over the duration of your solo, or you could develop one motif for a while and then start another, or you can start with a motif and then play some random ideas, then come back to your motif. The possibilities are endless, and are ultimately determined by your own style and musical tastes.Motifs are also a great way to start a solo. I don't know about you, but I don't always know what I want to play when I put the horn to my mouth and start my solo (my best ideas come to me while I'm soloing). When this happens, I find it's best to just play a simple 3-5-note motif and develop that for a while. If I have a better idea during the development of the motif, then I (try to) smoothly transition to the new idea and go with it. If I don't come up with anything better, then I just stick to the motif.  
Most people fixate on theory because it's relatively straightforward to learn and teach. This stems from its similarity to the subject of mathematics. Like math, theory forces us to learn a bunch of rules and formulas. The notation even looks mathematical, with its use of numbers, roman numerals, various symbols, and plus and minus signs. So, on this level, it's familiar territory and somewhat palatable to those of us who did well in math class. You read it, memorize it, and move on to the next chapter.I'm not saying jazz theory is easy to master. I'm just saying that for most people, it's easier and faster to learn than ear training skills. In a few months you could learn everything you need to know about theory (at least the basics), yet it might take several years/decades to similarly develop your ears.Adding to its unpopularity is the fact that ear training is unpredictable. While you'll certainly improve with practice, that rate of progress will differ greatly from one person to the next. You'll have good days and bad days.If you're serious about learning jazz improvisation, then I strongly suggest that you learn at least some jazz theory. In the study of jazz improvisation (both in books and schools), there are two major components that rarely get the recognition they deserve: ear training and rhythm. Instead, the bulk of jazz education focuses mostly on theory -- learning what notes to play over which chords. While knowing jazz theory will help you to become a better player,
 

I think (much) greater advances are possible through strengthening ones ear and rhythmic skills. lunch for your ears- You should listen to this stuff. Start here- and go through my list ;“Porgy and Bess” (Miles Davis), “Ascension” (John Coltrane), “The Jazz Composer’s Orchestra” (Michael Mantler), “Live in San Francisco” (Archie Shepp)Listening/tunes: “Walkin’” and “Mysterioso” (J.J. Johnson), “Freddie the Freeloader” and “Flamenco Sketches” (Miles Davis), John Coltrane Plays the Blues (all tracks), “Cousin Mary” and “Mr. P.C.” (John Coltrane), “Sack O’ Woe” (Cannonball Adderley), “Now’s the Time” (J.J. Johnson), any blues record by Charles Mingus, Milt Jackson, Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Horace Silver, Jimmy Smith, Wes Montgomery.Then listen to- “Milestones” (Miles Davis), “Fat Girl” (Navarro); Bird: The Savory Recordings/Master Takes: Miles Davis’ solo on “Half Nelson”...Then isolate your ears with recordings by Bud Powell, John Lewis, Horace Silver, Thelonious Monk, Oscar Peterson, Wynton Kelly, Tommy Flanagan, only piano.



Using your intuition and feelings when improvising is most important be it at the most advanced level or just a basic beginner. To thoroughly approach this as an art form and something that has deep meaning is most important. The masters when they played, be it Johnny Dodds or Sidney Bechet or Bud Powell on through the greats like Wayne Shorter or Charlie Mariano all came from a very deep place. At times, this place is something that you must go to in a natural way. Nothing cosmic about it, it's almost like a trance. It's almost like when your telling someone a story and you close your eyes and you're taking them somewhere with you. Art Pepper wrote a song about this called "The Trip." Stan Getz called this frame of mind the "alpha state."Whether its experienced in dreams, altered states, or simply sitting in solitude, the artist must be aware of the visionary realm. 

Opening your thoughts to the unknown realms of your own imagination. Many times musicians inquest to unlock the force behind this theory of the eye has shadowed their colleagues throughout ancient history.  What I'm getting at here is nothing cosmic or nothing too whacked out...what I'm trying to bring your attention is music needs all the imagination from an individual it can get. When unconscious-unspoken communication, traveling at the speed of thought, becomes the only or at least the truest form of communication, you just know everything is clicking just like it should ... the energy is like a ball and bounces around through glances and body communication.It is awesome, it's the inner spirit of your mind in it's highest form. At this point in time in jazz, everything seems to be published and everything seems to almost be written down. We are in a great educational state. But where are the people who are really reaching within and trusting themselves to their own creative muse? This is the element that I am addressing here. As a student of music, take some time to think about using your intuition. As Bird said, "First you master the music, then you master your horn, then you forget all that shit and just play!"We need to keep that in the front part of our minds and make that a slogan similar to the many people who look to their "third eye." As you see, I'm trying to point out a parallel in creative paths. It's not easy. But it is easy when you bring it into your own consciousness and try to practice these aspects. Sure, licks, lines, inversions, and all that good stuff is of paramount importance.








But let us not forget to keep the magic in the music. Give all that you have and you shall receive more than you can imagine experiencing when playing jazz!Your gratitude empowers others to play even better. Remember fear destroys the souls ability to create. So start now and use the power of love to encompass all your decisions so fear has no room to exist in your life. Remove fear from your thoughts and you remove and limitations. All is illusion and all illusion is yours to control. So be connected. Everything happens for a reason. Chance is limited to a coin. Decision is limited to free will. We are limited to our decisions.....So there you have it. See you next week and hope some of this hits you.


Play with others as much as you can. Music is a personal experience, - TIM PRICE



Saxophone Study ...NYC, Skype & Reading, Pa. email me for details & to get started. Timpricejazz@aol.com




Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Tim Price Bloggin' For D'Addario Woodwinds- Part 2- "Give me 5"- Mindi Abair -guest artist.

Tim Price Bloggin' For D'Addario Woodwinds-
 

Part 2- "Give me 5"-

                           Mindi Abair -guest artist.





It has been my contention that the most valuable viewpoints come from those who do. Thus, it’s logical to assume that any saxist who is surviving in this field, and doing it with success, is doing something right. The energies we all put into our craft; The years of apprenticeship and life-struggle, and the never ending open tuition to the school of hard knocks is always balanced by the intense commitment to the horn, and the pure love of playing it.That is exactly why...Mindi Abair is doing Part 2 of these special info blogs of mine called- GIVE ME 5. One of my favorite artists, I personally can not get enough of her stuff. This to me is one of the essential releases in today's music- a must have!


1 talk about your conception and how you envision the boneshakers prior to even the first rehearsals and gigs

MINDI- first met Randy Jacobs when I moved to LA. I didn’t know anyone, and I was asked to come play with this rock band by Oliver Leiber (Jerry Leiber’s son).  I showed up and the guitarist was literally doing backflips off the stage in mid guitar solo.  It was wall to wall people… the loudest band I’ve ever played with… and it was a party!  That guitarist was Randy Jacobs.  He had started his own blues/rock band The Bonehskakers.  It was born out of Was Not Was and Bonnie Raitt’s band.  She actually said “You guys are boneshaking!” and inadvertently named the band.  I’ve always been a fan.  Through the years we’ve both played on each other’s records for years. toured on and off together and remained close friends.  Cut to about 3 years ago when The Boneshakers were on Stage X and my band was on Stage Y for the Newport Beach Jazz Fest.  I went over to sit in with him… we’re family.  I stayed for the whole set… it was magic.. inspiring… it’s what music should feel like every night!  That day we decided we should join forces and become Mindi Abair and The Boneshakers.
We did 3 days of rehearsal for our first gig together up in Seattle at Jazz Alley.  We’ve done Valentines week there for a dozen or so years.  I had a friend record, as I thought the band had an intangible magic.  That became our live record that we released months later in Sept 2015.  
This is our first studio record together.  It’s powerful, cohesive, definitely blues/rock, and fun to the core.  The music we wrote showcases the talents and quirks and fun of the band.  We all really came alive in the studio and recorded everything in 5 days as a band.  It was magic, but this time it was a studio record!  
There was great inspiration all around.  We were at EastWest Studios and The Foo Fighters were in the studio next to us mixing their record.  My drummer would disappear into Dave Grohl’s car to hear rough mixes.  I’d see them out there flipping their heads back and forth to the music.  It sounded amazing.  And Justin Timberlake was in the studio next to us on the other side.  Justin would hang around and vibe on our songs and introduced himself and his wife to me near the end of our recording.  Wow, what a great guy and a great music lover.  He loved my track with Fantastic Negrito, “She Don’t Cry No More."



2- Mindi to me you've always been somebody who which the audience with your horn. In this band that is even more profound than ever-also you seem to have created a niche that I do not hear happening in other places these days. Tell me about it!


Mindi -I miss the days when saxophone was as integral of an instrument as the electric guitar.  Junior Walker, King Curtis…these guys were at the top of the pop charts.  Amazing.  We’ve lost that.
  

Saxophone and the genre of jazz is perceived now by many Americans as “Kenny G” and happy elevator music.  That’s not all that’s out there.  My band has grit, abandon, love, and power that they emote in every set.  It’s non-stop.  It’s great musicianship, it’s real, it’s visceral and heart moving.  I wrote a lot of songs to fit this line up well and exploit everyone’s incredible talents.  Randy Jacobs and I are just riding the wave of energy that we’ve written and cultivated with this band. 




3- I always found a vocal ability in your playing that goes back to old-school type values and also telling the story when you played. I've heard you play tenor and it knocked me out - there's times when you play alto with the boneshakers I hear some of that bleeding through and it's amazing. Do you know what I'm talking about elaborate on that for the people.



Mindi- I definitely think as a singer.  And saxophone is the closest instrument to the human voice.  It has so much nuance and range of sound.  I grew up listening to Tina Turner and wanting to be her. Nancy Wilson from Heart had that cool leg kick during her guitar solos.  I thought Heart was amazing.  I started school band playing a saxophone because I’d watched my father play sax growing up on the road with his band.  It looked like he was having a great time playing it knocking his knees together and shimmying out notes.  When I was in college I practiced playing to records of singers… gospel ensembles, Stevie Wonder, etc.  I loved their phrasing.  I feel that saxophone is a beautiful extension of who I am.  It amplifies the emotion I can put out in every way.


4-what are some things that you expect to be happening in the future with this particular band and also the music. And also discuss some of the songs on the new CD and the directions they are headed and where they came from.


 Mindi- This record is a blast.  It’s pure energy from every band member.  I wrote about 50 songs and pared it down to 11 for the recording.  We recorded at EastWest Studios in Hollywood.  We did 5 days with the Foo Fighters in the studio behind us and Justin Timberlake in the studio beside us.  Now that’s some great mojo.  My drummer would be listening to Foo Fighters mixes in Dave Grohl’s car on breaks!  It’s an amazing studio, and we had so much fun recording “old school” as a band for 5 days.  There were no fixes and overdubs.  If we went in to do a tambourine track over the top, the rest of us would go in and sing backgrounds and keep it a gang vibe.  It was all of the band all of the time.  So much fun.

5- is there anything else that you would like to talk about? I could ask you another 50 questions and I know you would have amazing answers. But this one's open to you. Is this something that you would like to add to all of this.?



Mindi- I wrote a song for the record called “Pretty Good For A Girl.”  Joe Bonamassa came in and recorded it with us.  He was incredible.  The song speaks about my journey as a woman in a man’s world, and that phrase “Pretty Good For A Girl” has become a motivating call for me.. a mantra.  I built a website where we feature women that are doing amazing things http://www.prettygoodforagirl.net   There are so many women accomplishing amazing things in music and beyond.  We’re asking women to submit video clips to be in my music video for the song “Pretty Good For A Girl."  I think it’s great to uplift the women out there who are breaking glass ceilings daily.  I didn’t think twice about being a woman playing saxophone.  No one told me there were glass ceilings to break out there, but I think it’s pretty incredible to be a part of shattering some of those that are left.



There you have it dear reader Part 2 - Of GIVE ME 5 With Mindi Abair.

Please take note of her answer on question 2 and I quote-
 " I miss the days when saxophone was as integral of an instrument as the electric guitar.  Junior Walker, King Curtis…these guys were at the top of the pop charts.  Amazing.  We’ve lost that."  
 

From the mouth of a master player and someone who is out there and knows. Listen and learn!
I couldn't agree more- As  I say in the start of this blog -  " It has been my contention that the most valuable viewpoints come from those who do. Thus, it’s logical to assume that any saxist who is surviving in this field, and doing it with success, is doing something right." Mindi is laying knowledge out- listen and check it.


Her CD to me is a breath of fresh air- The very best music on today's scene and all the players in the " Boneshakers" are world class legends!

Thank you so much Mindi for your time, soul and being you.  - Tim Price- D'Addario blogger.







Tim Price Bloggin' For D'Addario Woodwinds- Part 2- "Give me 5"- Mindi Abair -guest artist.





It has been my contention that the most valuable viewpoints come from those who do. Thus, it’s logical to assume that any saxist who is surviving in this field, and doing it with success, is doing something right. The energies we all put into our craft; The years of apprenticeship and life-struggle, and the never ending open tuition to the school of hard knocks is always balanced by the intense commitment to the horn, and the pure love of playing it.That is exactly why...Mindi Abair is doing Part 2 of these special info blogs of mine called- GIVE ME 5.



1 talk about your conception and how you envision the boneshakers prior to even the first rehearsals and gigs

 
MINDI- first met Randy Jacobs when I moved to LA. I didn’t know anyone, and I was asked to come play with this rock band by Oliver Leiber (Jerry Leiber’s son).  I showed up and the guitarist was literally doing backflips off the stage in mid guitar solo.  It was wall to wall people… the loudest band I’ve ever played with… and it was a party!  That guitarist was Randy Jacobs.  He had started his own blues/rock band The Bonehskakers.  It was born out of Was Not Was and Bonnie Raitt’s band.  She actually said “You guys are boneshaking!” and inadvertently named the band.  I’ve always been a fan.  Through the years we’ve both played on each other’s records for years. toured on and off together and remained close friends.  Cut to about 3 years ago when The Boneshakers were on Stage X and my band was on Stage Y for the Newport Beach Jazz Fest.  I went over to sit in with him… we’re family.  I stayed for the whole set… it was magic.. inspiring… it’s what music should feel like every night!  That day we decided we should join forces and become Mindi Abair and The Boneshakers.

We did 3 days of rehearsal for our first gig together up in Seattle at Jazz Alley.  We’ve done Valentines week there for a dozen or so years.  I had a friend record, as I thought the band had an intangible magic.  That became our live record that we released months later in Sept 2015.  

This is our first studio record together.  It’s powerful, cohesive, definitely blues/rock, and fun to the core.  The music we wrote showcases the talents and quirks and fun of the band.  We all really came alive in the studio and recorded everything in 5 days as a band.  It was magic, but this time it was a studio record!  

There was great inspiration all around.  We were at EastWest Studios and The Foo Fighters were in the studio next to us mixing their record.  My drummer would disappear into Dave Grohl’s car to hear rough mixes.  I’d see them out there flipping their heads back and forth to the music.  It sounded amazing.  And Justin Timberlake was in the studio next to us on the other side.  Justin would hang around and vibe on our songs and introduced himself and his wife to me near the end of our recording.  Wow, what a great guy and a great music lover.  He loved my track with Fantastic Negrito, “She Don’t Cry No More."



2- Mindi to me you've always been somebody who which the audience with your horn. In this band that is even more profound than ever-also you seem to have created a niche that I do not hear happening in other places these days. Tell me about it!

Mindi -I miss the days when saxophone was as integral of an instrument as the electric guitar.  Junior Walker, King Curtis…these guys were at the top of the pop charts.  Amazing.  We’ve lost that.
  

Saxophone and the genre of jazz is perceived now by many Americans as “Kenny G” and happy elevator music.  That’s not all that’s out there.  My band has grit, abandon, love, and power that they emote in every set.  It’s non-stop.  It’s great musicianship, it’s real, it’s visceral and heart moving.  I wrote a lot of songs to fit this line up well and exploit everyone’s incredible talents.  Randy Jacobs and I are just riding the wave of energy that we’ve written and cultivated with this band. 




3- I always found a vocal ability in your playing that goes back to old-school type values and also telling the story when you played. I've heard you play tenor and it knocked me out - there's times when you play alto with the boneshakers I hear some of that bleeding through and it's amazing. Do you know what I'm talking about elaborate on that for the people.



I definitely think as a singer.  And saxophone is the closest instrument to the human voice.  It has so much nuance and range of sound.  I grew up listening to Tina Turner and wanting to be her. Nancy Wilson from Heart had that cool leg kick during her guitar solos.  I thought Heart was amazing.  I started school band playing a saxophone because I’d watched my father play sax growing up on the road with his band.  It looked like he was having a great time playing it knocking his knees together and shimmying out notes.  When I was in college I practiced playing to records of singers… gospel ensembles, Stevie Wonder, etc.  I loved their phrasing.  I feel that saxophone is a beautiful extension of who I am.  It amplifies the emotion I can put out in every way.


4-what are some things that you expect to be happening in the future with this particular band and also the music. And also discuss some of the songs on the new CD and the directions they are headed and where they came from.


 This record is a blast.  It’s pure energy from every band member.  I wrote about 50 songs and pared it down to 11 for the recording.  We recorded at EastWest Studios in Hollywood.  We did 5 days with the Foo Fighters in the studio behind us and Justin Timberlake in the studio beside us.  Now that’s some great mojo.  My drummer would be listening to Foo Fighters mixes in Dave Grohl’s car on breaks!  It’s an amazing studio, and we had so much fun recording “old school” as a band for 5 days.  There were no fixes and overdubs.  If we went in to do a tambourine track over the top, the rest of us would go in and sing backgrounds and keep it a gang vibe.  It was all of the band all of the time.  So much fun.

5- is there anything else that you would like to talk about? I could ask you another 50 questions and I know you would have amazing answers. But this one's open to you. Is this something that you would like to add to all of this.?


 
I wrote a song for the record called “Pretty Good For A Girl.”  Joe Bonamassa came in and recorded it with us.  He was incredible.  The song speaks about my journey as a woman in a man’s world, and that phrase “Pretty Good For A Girl” has become a motivating call for me.. a mantra.  I built a website where we feature women that are doing amazing things http://www.prettygoodforagirl.net   There are so many women accomplishing amazing things in music and beyond.  We’re asking women to submit video clips to be in my music video for the song “Pretty Good For A Girl."  I think it’s great to uplift the women out there who are breaking glass ceilings daily.  I didn’t think twice about being a woman playing saxophone.  No one told me there were glass ceilings to break out there, but I think it’s pretty incredible to be a part of shattering some of those that are left.



There you have it dear reader Part 2 - Of GIVE ME 5 With Mindi Abair.

Please take note of her answer on question 2 and I quote-
 " I miss the days when saxophone was as integral of an instrument as the electric guitar.  Junior Walker, King Curtis…these guys were at the top of the pop charts.  Amazing.  We’ve lost that."  
 

From the mouth of a master player and someone who is out there and knows. Listen and learn!
I couldn't agree more- As  I say in the start of this blog -  " It has been my contention that the most valuable viewpoints come from those who do. Thus, it’s logical to assume that any saxist who is surviving in this field, and doing it with success, is doing something right." Mindi is laying knowledge out- listen and check it.


Her CD to me is a breath of fresh air- The very best music on today's scene and all the players in the " Boneshakers" are world class legends! Thank you so much Mindi for your time, soul and being you.  - Tim Price- D'Addario blogger.
















Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Tim Price Bloggin For D'Addario Woodwinds- - The Art Of Bassoon Reed styles


 

 This is a omnibus I use to add focus on reed making-kind of like a hands on reed adjusting and focus- You might know it and know the end results- But worth it for...review.

Learning how to scrape bassoon reeds can be a long process as much of how you learn will be based on trial & error.

The purpose of this section on Bassoon reeds is to help people get a better handle and understanding on the adjustment and the techniques of coming to grips with these double reed issues
Dig this- it just takes some basic common knowledge issues. Plus don't be afraid to make a mistake.

You can either use a file or a knife which must be kept very sharp using a sharpening stone for scraping the reed. When scraping the reed insert a bassoon plaque to support the reed and your knife / file. When scraping bassoon reeds only take a minute amount of cane off at a time and then try playing the reed before doing more editing. This is important as once you have scraped the reed you cannot reverse what you have done!

Below are some very generalized areas of the reed in which you can scrape to hopefully achieve the desired effect. The following points are very generalized as each reed is very different to the one before due to factors including the density of cane, when the cane was picked, direction of the grain, etc... and so how you scrape each reed and how it reacts will vary.
               

Generalized Effects After Scraping this Area:

A: Freer & flatter low register
B: Softer reed
C: Flatter low register
D: Easier tonguing & easier ppp in high register
E: Less resistant low register & overall flatter
F: More freedom & flexibility BUT weaker "sound" & stability
G: Makes sound brighter, more flexibility & easier tonguing  


Tips

  • When played loudly the reed doesn't play E or C# in the stave in tune. The E and / or C# dip flatter. After making sure the reed is balanced (see above) and the 2nd wire is tight clip off a very, very small amount of the tip of the reed off at a time. Then try the reed playing those two notes very loudly, continuing to clip until you no longer have a flat & unstable E.

    For a  bassoon reed to work at it's best (vibrate at its optimum level) it needs the be correctly balanced. This means that the reed should have the same thickness of cane on both front and back blades and on each half of both blades (see diagram below).
    If you are having a problem with your reed(s) the first step should be to check that it is correctly balanced as this quite often will solve the main problems with the reed.
    Below are 2 methods to use to check if the reed is balanced and if it is not, find where the issue is and correct it. For all of the tests you will need a very sharp reed making knife or diamond coated file to correct the issues.
    The following tests involve cane being removed from the reed. Therefore it is important to note that once you have removed the cane you can not put it back, thus only take a little cane off at a time! NOTE; So much info on these is compiled here. This is some ideas- techniques that are tried and true. I sure didn't invent these- I'm passing info/ pictures and thoughts out there.

    Bubble Test

    In this test you are aiming to have the opening at the tip of the bassoon reed, the 'bubble', symmetrical at all times. Place your index finger on one side of the bassoon reed and your thumb on the other so that they are both in the center back of the blade (so that if the bassoon reed wasn't there your thumb and index finger would be touching). Now gently press the fingers towards each other so that the reed starts to close at the tip (Try to keep the pressure of your finger and thumb equal).
    Ideally, when you are applying pressure to both sides the bubble at the tip of the bassoon reed will close equally on both sides so that when quite a lot of pressure is used both blades at the tip will touch at the same time. If they do, you need not do any more to that part of the bassoon reed.

    If the reed doesn't close symmetrically then note the side of the blade where the tip has the larger asymmetrical opening. Then go directly towards the back of the reed until you are in line with your finger and remove a small amount of cane from this area. Then redo the test with your finger and thumb in the same place and remove more cane if necessary until the reed begins to close more symmetrically and is thus more balanced.
    Repeat the whole process, each time moving your finger and thumb closer to the tip of the bassoon reed and then start at the back of the reed again but on the side of the reed and work forward again until your fingers have touched every area if the bassoon reed blade.



  •  Testing the reed ;

    This test uses a bassoon plaque & is very simple to carry out.

    Place the plaque in between the blades of the bassoon reed and then pull the plaque gently to one side of the reed so that you can see the longer edge of the plaque (diagram, right). Once you have done this you will be able to compare the edges of the blades of the reed. If one area is thicker than it is on the blade directly opposite from it, use the reed making knife or diamond file to remove cane from the thicker side. Once the one side has been checked pull the plaque to the other side and repeat the same process.

    This is the end of this info based blog- I'm trying to keep this info on tap so you younger folks have a " go to" to answer immediate question and TRY to get a result. The availability of books and help is becoming low so ...if this helps you that's WHY I did it...Have fun and don't give up- this world needs more bassoonists- Tim Price


    - Here are 2 sources of amazing information I love and drew much knowledge from- find them and study ok?!

    Although making your own bassoon reeds sounds impossible, this is not the case. I suggest with the help of a teacher- and these two books you try to get started as soon as you can.
    Bassoon Reed Making by Mark Popkin and Loren Glickman is one of the top bassoon reed making books available. Topics covered: bassoon reed making from tube to finished reed, instrument repair and maintenance and approaches to bassoon playing.
    Basic Reed-making, A Basic Technique by Christopher Weait -The book goes from tool selection all the way through making and finishing reeds from tube to final reed. An excellent book used by every bassoonist.









Thursday, September 7, 2017

Tim Price Bloggin' For D'Addario Woodwinds- STUFF TO SHED.... looking within.

Tim Price Bloggin' For D'Addario Woodwinds- STUFF TO SHED.... looking within.

~Improvising means creating music that is spontaneous, of the moment, and uniquely your own. So think of it as the instrument becomes a process of self-discovery, finding out what your music really sounds like. You develop a period of looking within, stripping away the excess and listening for the simple voice that really is our own. It’s there, listen for it.

Being able to improvise on I GOT RHYTHM changes appears much more as a puzzle or study that must be negotiated than as an opportunity look within and reach for new sounds you hear. Improvising means creating music that is spontaneous, of the now, and your own. It will not get played if you yourself don’t play it, and try. You have to focus your practicing for maximum progress towards creating a powerful forward motion as a player.

Add personal guidance of a master teacher and artist, and you’re poised to grow as a musician and as a performer.  Plus how to focus practicing of improvising on the essential elements,the actual substance of what to play and how to develop it in your personal style, and dealing with practicing of specific vocabulary.

It's what I call, what to shed! Then you got to understand jazz is part of culture. Bird, Prez,Basie,Pee Wee Russell, Roland Kirk, Duke, Hawk and all those giants who gave something to culture. What did they have? They had the the building blocks of jazz improvisation. MELODY ! Then guide-tone lines, and melodic Rhythm. Real world building blocks of jazz improvisation. In a word- BASICS that last for your career. Just some thinking on subjects we all love and are close to our agenda





 

Living a life of purpose reflects who you are deep inside, your beliefs, values and passion for living. It is about following your heart and doing what you love to do with passion and purpose. This may initially feel overwhelming and go too "deep" but that's exactly where you need to go - deep into your heart, beyond the busy, superficial day-to-day chores and demands of life. Beyond the fast paced day of the modern mom who typically deals with her career, various children's activities, computer viruses, proverbial household cleaning, - overall role of superwoman who never had or has had a chance to do some real soul searching for real meaning in her life. 

Despite the many resources of self-help tools available today via magazines, books, tapes, videos, and seminars, many still feel unfulfilled and lacking purpose in themselves, family and career. What ever happened to just getting together- making some coffee and playing some standards ad blues.Life is about choices - good, bad, happy, unhappy, purpose filled or void. It is important to intentionally and passionately seek to pursue joy, fulfillment and purpose despite the situations or people who may seem to be trying to take it away from you. Your choices should be reflective of who you are and what you believe in vs. the standards and beliefs of someone else.

Are you really hearing the music- or going for just who's popular?

 


 

The below...handwritten example- is a set of hybrid scales to try on So What-Impressions changes ;

You might like them- LISTEN.

Each person holds unique and very individualized gifts. Allow yourself to really explore your current and past skills - even some you may not even be aware of yet. But also....Recognize them, write them down and then think of how you could integrate your most compelling skills into an area of your life now. See you next week- Thanks for reading this blog- hope you dig the shed- Tim Price